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PennDOT, Police, Safety Partners, Focus on Seat Belt Safety as part of National ‘Click It or Ticket’ Initiative

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT), Pennsylvania State Police (PSP), Philadelphia Police Department, New Jersey Division of Highway Traffic Safety, Delaware State Police (DSP), and AAA Mid-Atlantic, held a media event today at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia to urge motorists to buckle up as part of the National “Click It or Ticket” seat belt enforcement mobilization running through June 4.

“Safety is our top priority, and this department is proud to stand with local law enforcement officials to help spread the word about the importance of buckling up,” said PennDOT Safety Press Officer Krys Johnson. “Always buckle up when you get in your vehicle, and make sure all passengers are buckled before you start driving.

According to national data, wearing your seat belt can increase your chances of surviving a crash by up to 60%.

In 2022 there were 3,594 crashes in the Philadelphia region on where at least one occupant was not wearing a seat belt, resulting in 93 fatalities.

With support from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Pennsylvania State Police, and municipal police departments across the state, all have worked together to send a zero-tolerance message to unbuckled motorists through enforcement and public awareness activities. In addition, beginning May 15, police departments across state lines will work together through the Border-tw`zo-Border initiative to ensure all motorists are buckled up.

“A seat belt can save your life, but only if you use it,” said New Jersey Division of Highway Traffic Safety Director Michael J. Rizol, Jr. “By working alongside our state and federal partners during the annual “Click It or Ticket” campaign, we reinforce this crucially important safety messaging to the public, reminding them that it is not only irresponsible and dangerous to not buckle up, it’s also illegal.”

Due to the rise of fatal and injury collisions without seat belt usage, the Delaware State Police have put a focus on enforcement of unrestrained motorists. The use of a seat belt can simply save your life. The best gift you can give your family is you, so please be safe,” said DSP Public Information Officer Jason Hatchell.

In Pennsylvania, drivers, and passengers 18 years and older are required to wear a seat belt when behind the wheel or in the front passenger seat. If you are a driver 18 or older and police pull you over for another violation, you’ll receive a second ticket if you or your front-seat passengers aren’t wearing seat belts.

Pennsylvania’s Primary Seat Belt Law requires drivers and passengers under 18 years of age to buckle up anywhere in the vehicle. Additionally, drivers under 18 may not operate a vehicle where the number of passengers exceed the number of available seat belts.

File Image: Pennsylvania State Police

During Click It or Ticket, PSP troopers certified as child passenger safety technicians offer car seat fittings and inspections at various locations throughout the state. The complete list of days and times can be found at psp.pa.gov.

“Wearing your seat belt is your best line of defense against injury. Set the example for others to follow. Fasten your seat belt, someone needs you. Don’t learn safety by accident,” said PSP Trooper Jessica Tobin. “Visit our website at www.psp.pa.gov to learn more about child passenger safety and occupant protection.

Caregivers who cannot attend one of the events can always contact their nearest Pennsylvania State Police station to schedule an appointment

Under Pennsylvania’s Primary Child Passenger Safety Law, children under the age of four must be properly restrained in an approved child safety seat anywhere in the vehicle. Additionally, children under the age of two must be secured in a rear-facing car seat until they meet the maximum weight or height requirements set by the seat manufacturer. Children must ride in an appropriate booster seat until their eighth birthday.

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PennDOT, Police, Safety Partners, Focus on Seat Belt Safety as part of National ‘Click It or Ticket’ Initiative

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT), Pennsylvania State Police (PSP), Philadelphia Police Department, New Jersey Division of Highway Traffic Safety, Delaware State Police (DSP), and AAA Mid-Atlantic, held a media event today at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia to urge motorists to buckle up as part of the National “Click It or Ticket” seat belt enforcement mobilization running through June 4.

“Safety is our top priority, and this department is proud to stand with local law enforcement officials to help spread the word about the importance of buckling up,” said PennDOT Safety Press Officer Krys Johnson. “Always buckle up when you get in your vehicle, and make sure all passengers are buckled before you start driving.

According to national data, wearing your seat belt can increase your chances of surviving a crash by up to 60%.

In 2022 there were 3,594 crashes in the Philadelphia region on where at least one occupant was not wearing a seat belt, resulting in 93 fatalities.

With support from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Pennsylvania State Police, and municipal police departments across the state, all have worked together to send a zero-tolerance message to unbuckled motorists through enforcement and public awareness activities. In addition, beginning May 15, police departments across state lines will work together through the Border-tw`zo-Border initiative to ensure all motorists are buckled up.

“A seat belt can save your life, but only if you use it,” said New Jersey Division of Highway Traffic Safety Director Michael J. Rizol, Jr. “By working alongside our state and federal partners during the annual “Click It or Ticket” campaign, we reinforce this crucially important safety messaging to the public, reminding them that it is not only irresponsible and dangerous to not buckle up, it’s also illegal.”

Due to the rise of fatal and injury collisions without seat belt usage, the Delaware State Police have put a focus on enforcement of unrestrained motorists. The use of a seat belt can simply save your life. The best gift you can give your family is you, so please be safe,” said DSP Public Information Officer Jason Hatchell.

In Pennsylvania, drivers, and passengers 18 years and older are required to wear a seat belt when behind the wheel or in the front passenger seat. If you are a driver 18 or older and police pull you over for another violation, you’ll receive a second ticket if you or your front-seat passengers aren’t wearing seat belts.

Pennsylvania’s Primary Seat Belt Law requires drivers and passengers under 18 years of age to buckle up anywhere in the vehicle. Additionally, drivers under 18 may not operate a vehicle where the number of passengers exceed the number of available seat belts.

File Image: Pennsylvania State Police

During Click It or Ticket, PSP troopers certified as child passenger safety technicians offer car seat fittings and inspections at various locations throughout the state. The complete list of days and times can be found at psp.pa.gov.

“Wearing your seat belt is your best line of defense against injury. Set the example for others to follow. Fasten your seat belt, someone needs you. Don’t learn safety by accident,” said PSP Trooper Jessica Tobin. “Visit our website at www.psp.pa.gov to learn more about child passenger safety and occupant protection.

Caregivers who cannot attend one of the events can always contact their nearest Pennsylvania State Police station to schedule an appointment

Under Pennsylvania’s Primary Child Passenger Safety Law, children under the age of four must be properly restrained in an approved child safety seat anywhere in the vehicle. Additionally, children under the age of two must be secured in a rear-facing car seat until they meet the maximum weight or height requirements set by the seat manufacturer. Children must ride in an appropriate booster seat until their eighth birthday.

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