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Resource Center to Open for Flood Victims in Croydon Tuesday, Officials Say

A multi-agency temporary resource center for victims of Monday’s flooding in Lower Bucks is coming next week to Bristol Township.
Featuring representatives from more than a dozen state, local, county and regional agencies, the resource center will be open from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in the cafeteria of Keystone Elementary School, 1800 Keystone Street, Croydon.
County officials discussed the event Friday while leading Gov. Tom Wolf on a tour of flood-damaged residences in Bristol Township and Bensalem.
“We’re going to have state officials, county officials and non-profit people there to offer any assistance that we can,” said Bucks County Commissioner Bob Harvie (D).
Credit: state Rep Tina Davis

 

Pennsylvania Emergency Management Administration (PEMA) and county emergency management officials are still on the ground assessing damage in southeastern Pennsylvania. In order to receive a federal disaster declaration for Individual Assistance, which provides money directly to homeowners and renters, the commonwealth would need to reach certain thresholds for the number of homes that fit into the classification of “major damage” or “destroyed” along with other considerations which are specified on the FEMA website.

In order to receive a federal disaster declaration for public assistance, which provides funding to governments and certain eligible non-profits to repair or replace damaged infrastructure, counties must meet individual thresholds that are based on population, and the commonwealth overall must meet a threshold of $19.6 million in damages. It can be difficult to reach federal thresholds, an issue Gov. Wolf intends to raise with FEMA official.

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“Thank you to the first responders, emergency management personnel and local officials who reacted so quickly to keep people safe and begin cleanup efforts,” Gov. Wolf said. “And thank you to the residents of these communities and Northeast Philadelphia, who have pulled together in the face of this crisis to take care of one another.”

State Representative Tina Davis (D), a Croydon resident herself, met with residents also to hear their stories and concerns, thanked Wolf for coming out to see the damages the flash floods caused.

Congressman Brian Fitzpatrick (R), also on hand said As of right now, PEMA and County emergency service units are continuing to evaluate the damage caused by the 100-year flood. At the moment, there are over 400 houses that have been impacted in some fashion by the flood with now over 100 houses classified having major damage according to PEMA.

If you experienced any property damage, please contact the following numbers:
Bensalem Township: 215-633-3758
Bristol Township: 267-812-2938
Bristol Borough: 215-788-3828, extension 12.

 

Credit: Rep Brian Fitzpatrick

 

 

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Resource Center to Open for Flood Victims in Croydon Tuesday, Officials Say

A multi-agency temporary resource center for victims of Monday’s flooding in Lower Bucks is coming next week to Bristol Township.
Featuring representatives from more than a dozen state, local, county and regional agencies, the resource center will be open from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in the cafeteria of Keystone Elementary School, 1800 Keystone Street, Croydon.
County officials discussed the event Friday while leading Gov. Tom Wolf on a tour of flood-damaged residences in Bristol Township and Bensalem.
“We’re going to have state officials, county officials and non-profit people there to offer any assistance that we can,” said Bucks County Commissioner Bob Harvie (D).
Credit: state Rep Tina Davis

 

Pennsylvania Emergency Management Administration (PEMA) and county emergency management officials are still on the ground assessing damage in southeastern Pennsylvania. In order to receive a federal disaster declaration for Individual Assistance, which provides money directly to homeowners and renters, the commonwealth would need to reach certain thresholds for the number of homes that fit into the classification of “major damage” or “destroyed” along with other considerations which are specified on the FEMA website.

In order to receive a federal disaster declaration for public assistance, which provides funding to governments and certain eligible non-profits to repair or replace damaged infrastructure, counties must meet individual thresholds that are based on population, and the commonwealth overall must meet a threshold of $19.6 million in damages. It can be difficult to reach federal thresholds, an issue Gov. Wolf intends to raise with FEMA official.

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“Thank you to the first responders, emergency management personnel and local officials who reacted so quickly to keep people safe and begin cleanup efforts,” Gov. Wolf said. “And thank you to the residents of these communities and Northeast Philadelphia, who have pulled together in the face of this crisis to take care of one another.”

State Representative Tina Davis (D), a Croydon resident herself, met with residents also to hear their stories and concerns, thanked Wolf for coming out to see the damages the flash floods caused.

Congressman Brian Fitzpatrick (R), also on hand said As of right now, PEMA and County emergency service units are continuing to evaluate the damage caused by the 100-year flood. At the moment, there are over 400 houses that have been impacted in some fashion by the flood with now over 100 houses classified having major damage according to PEMA.

If you experienced any property damage, please contact the following numbers:
Bensalem Township: 215-633-3758
Bristol Township: 267-812-2938
Bristol Borough: 215-788-3828, extension 12.

 

Credit: Rep Brian Fitzpatrick

 

 

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